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Tai Chi and mindfulness-based stress reduction in a Boston Public Middle School

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Robert Wall is a recent graduate of the Massachusetts General Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Mass. He is a Family Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist in psychiatric nursing. He holds a Master of Divinity from the Episcopal Divinity School, Cambridge, Mass., and has worked as a psychotherapist for many years. Mr. Wall is a certified instructor of Tai Chi, Chi Gong, and mindfulness meditation.
    Robert B. Wall
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Robert B. Wall, 13 Crombie St, Salem, MA 01970
    Footnotes
    1 Robert Wall is a recent graduate of the Massachusetts General Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Mass. He is a Family Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist in psychiatric nursing. He holds a Master of Divinity from the Episcopal Divinity School, Cambridge, Mass., and has worked as a psychotherapist for many years. Mr. Wall is a certified instructor of Tai Chi, Chi Gong, and mindfulness meditation.
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Robert Wall is a recent graduate of the Massachusetts General Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Mass. He is a Family Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist in psychiatric nursing. He holds a Master of Divinity from the Episcopal Divinity School, Cambridge, Mass., and has worked as a psychotherapist for many years. Mr. Wall is a certified instructor of Tai Chi, Chi Gong, and mindfulness meditation.
      This article provides a description of a clinical project that used combined Tai Chi and mindfulness-based stress reduction as an educational program. The 5-week program demonstrated that sustained interest in this material in middle school–aged boys and girls is possible. Statements the boys and girls made in the process suggested that they experienced well-being, calmness, relaxation, improved sleep, less reactivity, increased self-care, self-awareness, and a sense of interconnection or interdependence with nature. The curriculum is described in detail for nurses, teachers, and counselors who want to replicate this type of instruction for adolescent children. This project infers that Tai Chi and mindfulness-based stress reduction may be transformational tools that can be used in educational programs appropriate for middle school–aged children. Recommendations are made for further study in schools and other pediatric settings.
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